Man wearing overalls and hard hat in factory using laptop

Health and safety consultancy service

Helping our farming and other business customers

We understand that the Government restrictions relating to Coronavirus have meant new ways of working and new employees to manage. To help during these challenging times, we've launched some specifically related health and safety guidance to support our farming and other business customers, as well as continuing to offer one-to-one health and safety consultancy via our risk management team.

You can find additional resources and support information under each of the categories below.

Reopening your Business

Many businesses are starting to think about reopening, and are hoping to do so as soon as Government guidelines allow that to happen. We’ve made some guides and checklists available to those running businesses, which set out practical steps that should be considered when planning on how best to do this, whilst still safeguarding staff and others against Coronavirus. There are also other documents available, aimed at your employees.

Download our guides for more information. For further guidance or to discuss your specific circumstances, contact our risk management team.

Guidance on safely reopening your business during Coronavirus [PDF: 2KB]

General checklist for  safely reopening your business during Coronavirus [PDF: 2KB]

Coronavirus Risk Assessment Example [Word: 1.6MB]

Building and Equipment considerations for reopening during coronavirus [PDF: 1.8MB]

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Workplace safety

With the outbreak of Coronavirus, a priority for farming and other businesses will be to safeguard employees' health and well-being if they continue to carry out their job in their normal place of work.

As employers look to changing working practices for continuity, we have produced resources to help you manage these risks, which detail practical guidance and provide links to further resources and useful third-party websites.

The guidance on preventing the spread of Coronavirus in the workplace includes cleaning and disinfecting, managing social distancing, handwashing, managing sickness and return to work, and managing contractors.

Guidance on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), First Aid and RIDDOR reporting is also available.

Download our guides for more information. For further guidance or to discuss your specific circumstances, contact our risk management team.

Guidance on Preventing the spread of Coronavirus in the workplace [PDF: 1mb]
Guidance on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), First Aid and RIDDOR reporting
[PDF: 1.2mb]
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A look at best practice when it comes to managing employees working from home and those working in isolation.

Working from Home

As an employer you have the same health and safety responsibilities for home workers as you do for any other workers.

This should involve discussing and identifying the risks associated with home working and putting controls in place to reduce these risks where possible. Factors that should be considered include working hours, breaks, comfortable working, lone working, slips and trips, mental health / well-being and electrical and fire safety.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has determined, however, that there is no increased risk from display screen equipment (DSE) for those working at home temporarily. Therefore employers do not need to complete home work-station assessments.

Lone Working

Following the restrictions put in place by the Government to manage the spread of Coronavirus, many businesses have had to adapt their ways of working, which has resulted in a rise in the number of people working alone. This could be because of reduced staffing due to illness or self-isolation, staff working from home, buildings no longer being occupied, or the need to furlough staff.

In order to make sure your lone workers are kept safe you need to assess the risks, so think about who will be involved and which hazards could harm those working alone.

Download our guides for more information. For further guidance or to discuss your specific circumstances, contact our risk management team.

Guidance on temporary working from home during Coronavirus [PDF: 1mb]
Guidance on working alone during Coronavirus [PDF: 1mb]
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What you need to think about when it comes to managing your buildings and equipment.

Maintenance and Statutory Inspections of Equipment

Essential thorough examinations, statutory inspections as well as preventative maintenance and repairs should still be carried out during the current Coronavirus restrictions. It’s also critical they are done safely and within the Government guidelines.

Unoccupied Buildings

Following the Government restrictions that have been put in place to manage the Coronavirus outbreak, some buildings have been left partially empty or wholly unoccupied.

Unoccupied buildings can be prone to malicious damage and arson related damage with over 9,000 fires reported every year. They can also be the source of personal accidents.

To help avoid damage and injury, it’s essential procedures are put in place to manage unoccupied buildings during the lockdown period. This could also help to avoid unexpected losses or claims.

Download our guides for more information. For further guidance or to discuss your specific circumstances, contact our risk management team.

Guidance on unoccupied buildings during Coronavirus [PDF: 1mb]
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Important things to consider when employing foreign or temporary workers.

If you’re experiencing reduced staffing levels due to Coronavirus, you may need to recruit new staff to keep your operations going. Some of these new recruits may not have experience doing the work your business undertakes and/or they may not be fluent in the English language.

To make sure that all your new workers fully understand how to carry out their tasks and are aware of the risks involved, you need to provide them with the right information, training and supervision.

In the case of foreign language speakers, you may need to find alternative ways to communicate, which can be as easy as using other staff to translate, using pictorial images or translator apps. Make sure you check that they have understood, whilst ensuring social distancing is maintained.

Download our guides for more information. For further guidance or to discuss your specific circumstances, contact our risk management team.

Guidance on foreign and temporary workers during Coronavirus [PDF: 1.1mb]
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